Robbery with a deadly weapon is a serious charge.In Florida, robbery with a deadly weapon is a first-degree felony. The crime is committed when a person unlawfully and intentionally takes money and/or property from another individual by force, violence, assault, or threat while the person committing the crime is in possession of a deadly weapon.

What Constitutes a Deadly Weapon? 

The term “deadly weapon” is a little bit vague (likely intentionally so), but easy to understand. A weapon can be defined as a deadly weapon if you use it—or threaten to use it—in a manner likely to lead to great bodily harm or death.

We want to call attention to something important in that description. You do not have to actually use the weapon in question to be charged with robbery with a deadly weapon. It is sufficient that you are in possession of such a weapon during the commission of a robbery. 

What Are the Penalties for Robbery with a Deadly Weapon?

If you are charged with robbery with a deadly weapon, you are facing a minimum sentence of 34.5 months (nearly three years) in prison if you are convicted of the crime. Again, that’s the minimum. Your sentence could also include:

  • Up to 30 years in prison
  • Up to 30 years of probation
  • Fines totaling up to $10,000

Obviously, those are severe penalties, which is why it is absolutely essential that you have a skilled defense attorney working on your behalf.

What Can Your Criminal Defense Attorney Do?

A defense attorney will make sure your rights are protected and will mount a vigorous defense against the charges you are facing. Your attorney will work to understand the details of your specific case and then apply their knowledge of the law to defend you as effectively as possible. 

If You Have Been Arrested, We Can Help. Contact Our Criminal Defense Attorneys Today.

The lawyers of Flaherty & Merrifield Criminal Defense are ready to go to work for you. If you have been charged with robbery with a deadly weapon, the time to bring a skilled defense attorney on board is right now. Contact us for a no-obligation consultation. It’s free and discreet—and may be the key to shaping an excellent defense.

 

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